Camino Pilgrimage

Rainbow WarriorsJoy, generosity, small words of kindness, humility and patience, a simple thought to others, our ways to be quiet, to listen, to look, to forgive, to speak. Here are the true drops of love.

Mother Theresa

I thought I’d begin to talk and write about my next adventure. I have been invited to France later this year and ever since, I have been thinking and reading about the Camino Trail. I first heard about it from a potter friend of mine, Pam who lived on Tamborine until recently and moved to Cairns. She made heart-shaped clay pieces which she gave to people she met, and asked them to take them home and hang them on a tree, or and take them to where ever they were going and hang them there. The message on these medallions is Peace. I have passed them to many visitors to the mountain. I’m sure they have been around the world many times. She had done a Camino walk and had changed her surname to one of the places en route.

Such a simple idea and an effective way of promoting peace, I thought. I have no idea how far she walked or any other details but it had obviously profoundly affected her life. So after being invited to the south of France this year I wanted to find out more and whether it was possible for me, so I have been busy researching and thinking how I might do part of it. Since my physical condition is not good, but I have been following my guidance since my own pilgrimage around Australia in 1996, described in my Uluru by Arunda book (available on line through my Facebook site), I thought I would allow myself to be guided to where I needed to go.

Claude Tranchant in her `Boots to Bliss’ book describes meeting two old women sitting on an outdoor bench. They had difficulty believing someone at the other end of the earth, Australia, could have heard of St James Way and that is what the Camino had been known as for thousands of years. Later she placed a heart shaped stone at the foot of a cross for the people she had known in her life and each time she found a cross, she deposited a heart-shaped stone for someone at its base. I’m sure I’ll be quoting from Claude’s book again as its the best book on the Camino I’ve found to date.

At Easter I was invited by a medium friend to meet someone I should meet. It turned out to be a most momentous meeting with another earth healer who has worked on the Camino, Sharon Bela-Verdy. We had lots to share and we set up a light point where she is living and I believe I’ll be working with her when I go to France. She is launching a Foundation – Green Beautiful Foundation to bring in the new energies for healing Gaia the Earth Mother. As a result of the weekend, a new level of energy has come in for me and relates to Te Aho the Maori leader who I tuned into previously and wrote about. I am now resting and integrating the new energies.

When I got home there was a pile of photocopied books left for me, including one on Atlantis by Shirley Andrews: Atlantis Insights from a Lost Civilization. In it she describes the Atlantean colonies which settled on the coast of Spain after Atlantis sank.

Hardy inhabitants of the community of Tarshish on Spain’s Atlantic coast returned when the water retreated around 10,000 BC, and by 7,000 BC Tarshish was again a thriving community renowned for its poetry laws and books. In 533 BC the Carthaginians sacked and burned the beautiful city but there are remains off the Spanish coast on the continental shelf which are visible to divers. Edgar Cayce also describes Atlanteans settling inland from the Bay of Biscay and settling in the Pyrenees where they lived in relative isolation, their descendants are the Basques. Their blood type has a much higher percentage of RH negative blood which is a characteristic of Atlantean descendants everywhere. The Basque language Eushera, reflects the prehistoric language and has common origin with Central American Guatemalan language. They are believed to be another Atlantean group, as are the Tuartha in Ireland. This book has a wealth of information on the Pleiadian contact and working with the leylines.

http://www.blurb.com/ebooks/352002-kakadu-dreaming

Kakadu Dreaming
Kakadu Dreaming
By Christine A Deacon

Photo book

Goldie, A Good Joke

 

Today I was at the Optometrist when I tuned into this portrait hanging in his rooms. His energy was very strong and I commented on that to the Optometrist who showed me that the original painting was sculptured to show the tattoos in 3 dimensions. Apparently they didn’t tattoo the eyes, as the windows to the soul. I have never been to New Zealand, so this is all new to me. I’m getting he is a part of my soul group. His energy is still strong, like he is with me. This all seems to be a result of the acupuncture I had earlier in the week which has increased my energy.

Possibly the most well-known Maori portrait painted by Goldie this painting was originally titled “All ‘e Same t’e Pakeha”. It is a portrait of a laughing Te Aho-te-Rangi Wharepu of Ngati Mahuta wearing a bowler hat and European style suit. Goldie himself produced (now very rare) signed prints of this painting whilst he was alive but for many years this image was unavailable as a print due to the reluctance of the painting’s owner for prints to made. In recent years prints of A Good Joke on fine art paper were published by the Capper Press and due to demand for a fine art canvas edition they have released in 2011 this stunning reproduction of the painting that is printed directly onto superb 100% cotton artists’ canvas. It has a black border around the image so it can be wrapped gallery style around a stretcher frame without losing any of the image.

Te Aho o te Rangi Wharepu, or Te Aho for short, was born about 1811 and became a famous tohunga of the Ngati Mahuta.

He was a contemporary of Potatau, the first Maori King, who in his younger days was known as Te Whero Whero, and he accompanied him on many of his campaigns including at least one as far north as Whangarei.

When Potatau, whose name incidently means “doorway to death” in reference to all those who passed that way when they met him on the battlefields, embraced Christianity he commanded Te Aho to lay aside his tohunga craft.

According to his family history he complied with the great chief’s wishes by symbolically laying the devices of his calling on a mat in front of Potatau.

From then on he used his great knowledge of Maori lore to the benefit of his people. He was a noted authority on mythology and an expert on canoe architecture and related culture.

GOOD FRIENDS

He met and became good friends with C.F. Goldie, whom he visited in Auckland on many occasions.

Goldie’s first portrait of Te Aho was completed in 1902 and was followed with another each year between 1905 and 1913.

The last few, however, must have been copied from photographs because the old chief died in 1910.

Te Aho was also a good friend of the celebrated Govenor Grey, who gifted him 248 acres of land at Maramarua in the Waikato.

Later Te Aho’s daughter, Hutukawa, went to Kawau Island as a companion-help to Grey and lived for some years at Mansion House.

When she eventually married, Grey provided her with a dowry and built a house for her family on the mainland at nearby Matakana, near Warkworth

 

Goldie,Te Aho o Te Rangi Wharepu painted 1905

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