How Aboriginal people experience the Bushfire crisis

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Strength From Grief: How Aboriginal People Experience the Bushfire Crisis

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The Anganu, traditional Aboriginal owners of Uluru-Kata-Tjuta in the Northern Territory, gather in front of the Uluru, also known as Ayers rock, after a permanent ban on climbing on October 26, 2019. The Anganu lobbied for the closure of the walking track because it undermined the landmark’s spiritual significance. Photo by Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images.

Strength From Grief: How Aboriginal People Experience the Bushfire Crisis

Bhiamie Williamson, Jessica Weir, & Vanessa Cavanagh, Yes! Magazine, Jan. 23, 2020

https://tinyurl.com/rv5njmf

How do you support people forever attached to a landscape after an inferno tears through their homelands: decimating native food sources, burning through ancient scarred trees, and destroying ancestral and totemic plants and animals?

The fact is, the experience of Aboriginal peoples in the fire crisis engulfing much of Australia is vastly different from that of non-Indigenous peoples.

Colonial legacies of eradication, dispossession, assimilation, and racism continue to affect the lived realities of Aboriginal peoples. Added to this is the widespread exclusion of our peoples from accessing and managing traditional homelands. These factors compound the trauma of these unprecedented fires.

As Australia picks up the pieces from these fires, it’s more important than ever to understand the unique grief that Aboriginal peoples experience. Only through this understanding can effective strategies be put in place to support our communities to recover.

Perpetual grief

Aboriginal peoples live with a sense of perpetual grief. It stems from the as-yet-unresolved matter of the invasion and subsequent colonization of our homelands.

While many instances of colonial trauma were inflicted upon Aboriginal peoples—including the removal of children and the suppression of culture, ceremony, and language—dispossession of Country remains paramount. Dispossessing people of their lands is a hallmark of colonization.

Aboriginal rights activist on Australia Day in Melbourne, Australia on January 26, 2018. Australia Day is named by some as Invasion Day due to the dispossession of Indigenous land and the arrival of the First Fleet’s at Port Jackson, Sydney, in 1788. Photo by Asanka Brendon Ratnayake/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images.

Australian laws have changed to partially return Aboriginal peoples’ lands and waters, and Aboriginal people have made their best efforts to advocate for more effective management of Country. But despite this, most of our peoples have been consigned to the margins in managing our homelands.

Aboriginal people have watched on and been ignored as homelands have been mismanaged and neglected.

Oliver Costello is chief executive of Firesticks Alliance, an Indigenous-led network that aims to reinvigorate cultural burning. As he puts it:

Since colonisation, many Indigenous people have been removed from their land, and their cultural fire management practices have been constrained by authorities, informed by Western views of fire and land management.

In this way, settler-colonialism is not historical, but a lived experience. And the growing reality of climate change adds to these anxieties.

It’s also important to recognize that our people grieve not only for our communities, but for our nonhuman relations. Aboriginal peoples’ cultural identity comes from the land.

As such, Aboriginal cultural lives and livelihoods continue to be tied to the land, including landscape features such as waterholes, valleys, and mountains, as well as native animals and plants.

The decimation caused by the fires deeply affects the existence of Aboriginal peoples and, in the most severely hit areas, threatens Aboriginal groups as distinct cultural beings attached to the land. As The Guardian’s Indigenous affairs editor Lorena Allam recently wrote:

Like you, I’ve watched in anguish and horror as fire lays waste to precious Yuin land, taking everything with it—lives, homes, animals, trees—but for First Nations people, it is also burning up our memories, our sacred places, all the things which make us who we are.

For Aboriginal people then, who live with the trauma of dispossession and neglect and now, the trauma of catastrophic fire, our grief is immeasurably different from that of non-Indigenous people.

Bushfire recovery must consider culture

As we come to terms with the fires’ devastation, Australia must turn its gaze to recovery. The field of community recovery offers valuable insights into how groups of people can come together and move forward after disasters.

But an examination of research and commentary in this area reveals how poorly non-Indigenous Australia (and indeed, the international field of community recovery) understands the needs of Aboriginal people.

The definition of “community” is not explicitly addressed, and thus is taken as a single sociocultural group of people.

But research in Australia and overseas has demonstrated that for Aboriginal people, healing from trauma—whether historical or contemporary—is a cultural and spiritual process, and inherently tied to land.

The culture-neutral standpoint in community recovery research as yet does not acknowledge these differences. Without considering the historical, political, and cultural contexts that continue to define the lives of Aboriginal peoples, responses to the crisis may be inadequate and inappropriate.

Resilience in the face of ongoing trauma

The long-term effects of colonization has meant Aboriginal communities are (for better or worse) accustomed to living with catastrophic changes to their societies and lands, adjusting and adapting to keep functioning.

Experts consider these resilience traits as integral for communities to survive and recover from natural disasters.

In this way, the resilience of Aboriginal communities fashioned through centuries of colonization, coupled with adequate support, means Aboriginal communities in fire-affected areas are well placed to not only recover, but to do so quickly.

This is a salient lesson for agencies and other nongovernment organizations entrusted to lead the disaster recovery process.

The community characteristics that enable effective and timely community recovery, such as close social links and shared histories, already exist in the Aboriginal communities affected.

Moving forward

The agency in charge of leading the recovery in bushfire-affected areas must begin respectfully and appropriately. And they must be equipped with the basic knowledge of our peoples’ different circumstances.

It’s important to note this isn’t “special treatment.” Instead, it recognizes that policy and practice must be fit-for-purpose and, at the very least, not do further harm.

Thousands of people take to the streets to mark the start of National Aboriginal and Islanders Day Observance Committee Week, which runs in the first full week of July each year. NAIDOC Week celebrations are held across Australia to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Photo by Darrian Traynor/Getty Images.

If agencies and non-government organizations responsible for leading the recovery from these fires aren’t well-prepared, they risk inflicting new trauma on Aboriginal communities.

The National Disability Insurance Agency offers an example of how to engage with Aboriginal people in culturally sensitive ways. This includes thinking about Country, culture, and community, and working with each community’s values and customs to establish respectful, trusting relationships.

The new bushfire recovery agency must use a similar strategy. This would acknowledge both the historical experiences of Aboriginal peoples and our inherent strengths as communities that have not only survived, but remain connected to our homelands.

In this way, perhaps the bushfire crisis might have some positive longer-term outcomes, opening new doors to collaboration with Aboriginal people, drawing on our strengths and values, and prioritizing our unique interests.

This article was originally published by The Conversation. It has been republished here with permission.

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Australian Earth Healing

I have been doing this work guided by spirit since my Around Australia trip in 1996, after working with Aboriginal elder Guboo Ted Thomas. Renewing the Dreaming is what he called it. I have some recorded tapes of him doing a Hummingbee, a toning to get you in touch with the Earth Mother Gaia which I’ll share when available.

Information shared by spirit prior to my walkabout is described in ULURU by Arunda. It is available as an eBook on my Links to Christine Deacon’s books

My Australia trip is shared in my book String of Pearls, now available online as an ebook ( on Facebook: Christine Deacon’s books).

Links to Christine Deacon’s books

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-2Ne

There have been more individual trips recorded on my WordPress blog as Renewing the Dreaming,  they follow String of Pearls. I have also worked overseas more recently. In France, Spain, Egypt and they are on my links to Christine Deacon’s books.

ULURU by Arunda

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-2m6

String of Pearls

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-2m8

Sydney

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-2Dh

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-1IR

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-1IR

Blue Mountains

Glastonbell 

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-33p

Billywillunga 

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-2Dt

Reading on the Activation

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-2zt


Renewing the Dreaming 

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-2Cy

Merimbula Selection

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-2Fe

Mullumbimby

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-20k

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-2KL

Activation at Wollumbin  

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-31w

Reading on the Activation

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-32H

Tooloom Falls 2

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-1BI

Great Artesian Basin

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-26t

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-26Q

https://wp.me/p2RpLw-27i

I’ve also published articles from other people under Earth Healing on my blog. The index on WordPress is found by clicking on Earth Healing on (Left hand side of screen.).

The Previously Interrupted Ceremony at Uluru

Pars Kutay: The Interrupted Ceremony – Planetary Chakra Activation

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On January 12th, 2020, Pars Kutay is asking people to send energy to the Ngaltawaddi Ceremony being held at Uluru, located in the Northern Territory, Australia.

We are to visualize the Cosmic Umbilical Cord, the Pathway of the Rainbow Serpent, as clear so greater health and vitality may circulate throughout the world Blessing All BEings.

We are breathing. . . relaxing. . . smiling. . . in gratitude to Gaia.

https://redwolfremarks.wordpress.com/2019/12/27/the-interrupted-ceremony-pars-kutay/

In January 2020, a massive planetary Energy Activation is due to occur on Earth at the time of the Saturn / Pluto conjunction.

At this time, the planetary Solar Plexus Chakra located at Uluru (formerly Ayre’s Rock) and Kata Tjuta, in Central Australia, will be fully activated.

Aboriginal lore tells of a ritual back in the Dreamtime that was interrupted and never completed. This ritual was meant to fulfill the Great Plan of the Earth Spirit.

Once the ritual is consummated, ‘perfection will spread throughout the world’.

In other words, this ritual will open the way from 4th to 5th World Consciousness.’

This event is symbolized by a Great Pole, or Cosmic Umbilical Cord, which unites Earth with the Sun.

It is predicted that this Cord will begin to function in 2020 AD, at the time of the Saturn / Pluto conjunction.

Together, Uluru and Kata Tjuta form the world Solar Plexus Chakra. This is the primary Chakra for the maintenance of global health and vitality of the planet, and all living things. If things are not right here, then the whole world system suffers.

It is NOW time for this to be healed. The healing began in October, 2019, when a total ban on climbing the Highly Sacred site of Uluru was declared.

According to Robert Coon, author of ‘The Rainbow Serpent and the Holy Grail’ this powerful activation will also involve a blast of Divine Light and Energy through the song lines (ley lines) of the planet, connecting all of Earth’s main Chakras together, and most especially one of the main Energy Arteries / song lines referred to by the Aboriginal people as The Rainbow Serpent (representing Divine Feminine Energy to many).

This line starts at Uluru (solar plexus) and travels through Bali (world purification center), to Glastonbury (heart and third eye chakras), to Lake Titicaca (sacral chakra) and then back around and through to Uluru.

The planetary event in January 2020 is actually a rare quadruple conjunction involving Saturn, Pluto, Mercury and the Sun.

The previously interrupted ceremony will culminate in the reactivation of the Solar Umbilical Cord of Planet Earth with the Sun, and on deeper levels with the Great Central Sun.

This, in turn, will assist in the creation of an archetypal communication between the Sun and Earth, to help us to more fully embrace a ‘Golden Age.’

***

Several weeks ago, one of our group received the message that ‘it is time to tap within’.

She was shown Bubbles of Light building up around the two energy centers of Uluru and Kata Tjuta.

She could see Aboriginal people singing this energy into a Bubble, then the waters breaking from an amniotic sac.

A pale blue, Crystalline Light

and then a Mauve Light built up around it.

She was told that part of the DNA of the Aboriginal people is vibrating and contributing to the Birthing / Activation.

We’re asking people to please send energy to the Ngaltawaddi Ceremony being held at Uluru, located in the Northern Territory, Australia, on January the 12th, 2020, and to visualize the Cosmic Umbilical Cord being healed.

Words to help open the World Solar Plexus Chakra:

Let the Sun Shine on Uluru and Kata Tjuta,

Let the Pathway of the Rainbow Serpent Be Clear,

So that Greater Health and Vitality may circulate
throughout the world to Bless All BEings;

Today, Breathe. . . Relax. . . Smile. . .
and Give Thanks to the Earth.

Pars Kutay

 

***

Flash Storm at Uluru

Uluru said goodbye to 2019 with a severe storm that lashed the nearby town of Yulara with lightning and torrential rain. The weather bureau reported this to be the type of storm that happens twice a century.

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***

Greater Health and Vitality may circulate
throughout the world to Bless All BEings;

Today, Breathe. . . Relax. . . Smile. . .
and Give Thanks to the Earth.

Pars Kutay

***

 

Day byDay 9

Yesterday I went to the acupuncturist for my regular appointment and pointed to a spot on my back below the shoulder blade which was sore. I’ve had a problem, we worked out, since Monday Night’s channelling, He said it’s a heart point and worked on it OK, so I need to be more open hearted to channel that level of energy. He said heat would help and put me on the infa-red lamp. Overnight I used the heating mat on my shoulder.

Today when I got up the shoulder was aching and now I’m flat in bed writing thiswith heat pad on I did finish Alcheringa by Val Barrow yesterday, so I’ll quote some of her conclusions from the last chapter.

I can’t share Val’s  conclusions at this point. I’m getting to share this from Jennifer Starlight

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1rN5RlWuyuheB8Z1s6_NvBzziDQi6O02-/view?usp=drivesdk

its an Audio of a channelling from Min her guide.

At this point I was told to get up, which I proceeded to do and made a celery drink, Then went outside to find  council workmen about to put in a sign, right where I drive the van into the carport. I asked them would they mind moving it a few metres and they did. I was sitting in the sun to heal my biopsy wounds and eczema . Again synchronous timing.

if you want to read Val Barrow’s conclusions you will have to contact her, via her Facebook or website for a copy of the Alcheringa book.

Day to Day 8

I got up late and took my time. Wrote up yesterday’s blog on Orgone Pyramids, photographing the one I brought from Melissa. Then the Monoatomic Andara Crystals arrived. I felt to make some into Orgone Pyramids and asked Melissa if she’d make me another one and she agreed. I was feeling very tired after the energy work on Monday night and fell asleep on the lounge.

I began reading Val Barrow’s book, Alcheringa. WOW!  The story is about an Alcheringa or Aboriginal Sacred Stone, and a being by the same name accessible by psychometry  She tunes into him via the Stone Alcheringa and tunes into a past life as a Pleiadian who comes to earth eons ago to start a colony from the Pleiades on the space ship RexegeniaThe space ship  Rexegena is destroyed by earthlings and only 90 of 50,000 people on board survive – interestingly it crashes in Kuringai an area I know and there are rock art sites nearby with further information on the survivors.

She taps into these by meeting survivors who are drawn to her and the story unfolds  as they awaken to their past history in another lifetime. They  are the first earth people and are genetic engineers who by artificial means mix their DNA with ancient ape-like people. The first experiments fail and the babies die, They perisist as they have difficulty with the earth atmosphere and find it difficult to breathe and want to establish a successful earth colony. The story is recorded in Egyptian type hieroglyphs at Kariong near Gosford.

As a story this is fascinating, as a reality, it throws all previous history as we know it, out the window. How exciting and just as we go into 5th D energies. This is a story whose time has come. With the presence of Pleiadians in our skies, we’re about to get confirmation of this ancient Aboriginal history. i’m Half way through the book and can’t wait to read more.

The singing Plants of the Sacred Forest of Damanhur

The Singing Plants in the Sacred Forest of Damanhur

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Can plants make music? If they could, what would it sound like?

Researchers have attached signal receivers to plants, to produce this:

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