Chinese herbal medicine and diabetes

The typical symptoms of Type 1 diabetes (insulin dependent) include: Increased thirst Dry mouth, Frequent urination, Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry), Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Blurred vision, Numbness or tingling of the hands or feet, Loss of consciousness (rare)

Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent) include: The same as those listed above, Slow-healing sores or cuts,  Itching skin (especially the groin or vaginal area), Yeast infections, Recent weight gain.

Recent studies show the following are effective in treating diabetes, by stimulating the insulin producing beta cells.

Arginine: a 2007 study found that the amino acid L-arginine is capable of stimulating the genesis of beta cells in an animal model of alloxan-induced diabetes.[2]

Avocado: A 2007 study found that avocado seed extract reduced blood sugar in diabetic rats. Researchers observed a restorative and protective effect on pancreatic islet cells in the treated group.[3]

Berberine: A 2009 study found that this plant compound, commonly found in herbs such as barberry and goldenseal, induces beta cell regeneration in diabetic rats, which lends explanation for why it has been used for 1400 years in China to treat diabetes.[4]

Chard: A 2000 study found that chard extract given to diabetic rats stimulates the recovery of injured beta cells.[5]

Corn Silk: A 2009 study found that corn silk reduces blood sugar and stimulates beta cell regeneration in type 1 diabetic rats.[6]

Curcumin (from Turmeric): A 2010 study found that curcumin stimulates beta cell regeneration in type 1 diabetic rats.[7] Additionally, a 2008 study found that curcumin preserves pancreatic islet cell survival and transplantation efficiency.[8]

Genistein (from soy, red clover): A 2010 study found that genistein induces pancreatic beta-cell proliferation through activation of multiple signaling pathways and prevents insulin-deficient diabetes in mice.[9]

Honey: A 2010 human study found that long-term consumption of honey might have positive effects on the metabolic derangements of type 1 diabetes, including possible beta cell regeneration as indicating by increases in fasting C-peptide levels.[10]

Nigella Sativa (black seed): A 2003 animal study found that black seed consumption lead to partial regeneration/proliferation of the beta-cells.[11] A 2010 human study also found that the consumption of one gram of black seed a day for up to 12 weeks had a broad range of beneficial effects in diabetics, including increasing beta cell function.[12]

Stevia: A 2011 human study found that stevia has anti-diabetic properties, including revitalizing damaged beta cells, and compares favorably with the drug glibenclamide but without the adverse effects.[13]

Traditional Chinese Medicine considers the causes of diabetes as imbalance in one of these meridians: Triple burner, Liver or Spleen. The treatment depends on which diagnosis is made. Traditional Chinese remedies can be used, in tandem with insulin, to treat the pancreas and other damaged internal organ functions gradually, control blood sugar, and reduce insulin dosage over time. This treatment aims to slowly reduce insulin intake while recovering the pancreatic functions until eventually insulin usage can be stopped completely. Thompson’s NZ offer a Glucose Manager which contains many effaceous herbs such as Gymnema, Ginko, Bilberry and others.

One prescription herbal formula includes Chinese mai men dong / ophipogonon, Jie Geng / Platycodon, and Wu WeiZi/Schisandra. This works to bring the Qi up into the lung, making it stronger and using the pulmonary energy to feed the entire body. The resulting increased abundance of Qi in the lung can promote the oxidation and utilization of sugar. Another prescription formula that includes, but is not limited to Diascoria/ Shan Yao, HuangQi/Astragalus, Fu Ling/ Poria, and Cang Zhu/Atractylodes, helps the body’s Qi nourish the spleen and pancreas. With adequate blood supply and vigorous circulation, beta cells can be repaired and pancreatic function restored.

Research studies have shown that this prescription formula can lower blood sugar in various degrees, and Huang Qi can inhibit gluconeogenesis (abnormal glucose formation). The function of Chinese Yam and Gou Qi Zi/Lycium in the prescription formula is to strengthen the kidney and nourish the liver. Since the kidney controls the fluid in the entire body, it is the master organ for fluid metabolism. Also, the kidney plays a leading role in the cause and development of diabetes. Modern medicine believes that the state of the spleen and kidney has a direct effect on metabolic and immune functions. Recent studies have shown that Chinese Yam, formulated with various other Chinese herbs, can fight against rising blood sugar caused by the adrenal gland. The prescription formula of Dan Shen / Salvia, San Leng/S.fluviatilis, E Zhu/ Curcuma, and Cang Zhu/Atracylodes relieves blood stasis (stagnation), promotes circulation, cleanses the pancreas and the surrounding congestion, and clears the channels of nutrient transport.

This contributes tremendously to the nourishment of the pancreas and cell repair. In diabetic pathology, metabolic disorders cause a deposit of pathogens that block the body’s flow of Qi. This results in poor Qi and blood flow, causing an obstruction in the back ribs. As a result, the pancreas and other organs lose nutrition and the disease worsens, leading to other related diseases and complications. (Western medicine has confirmed that in a Type 1 diabetic pancreas, there is a lot of blood stasis (stagnation).) –

See more at: http://vitalitymagazine.com/article/chinese-medicine-for-diabetes-sufferers/#sthash.BVeIPxd0.dpuf
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